Cannabis laws in Canada: The complete province-by-province guide

Cannabis laws in Canada: The complete province-by-province guide

What will the life of cannabis lovers be like this fall? Use this guide to get educated about recreational cannabis laws in Canada.

This summer, the federal government in Ottawa approved Bill C-45, a law that legalizes recreational use of cannabis in all provinces.

However, the federal government only determined a very broad set of rules, and it will be up to the provinces and municipalities to work around those rules and create a functional system.

So, there are some things that the federal government decided, but they’ve also left room for the provincial governments to tweak those same rules towards their preferences.

Seeing how provinces are allowed to amend even some of the federal rules to their own according, let us get a bit deeper into the specific rules of each province.

The only two things in common for all provinces is that they will maintain the federal possession limit of up to 30g of dried flower (or an equivalent) and ban consumption in vehicles.

Cannabis laws in British Columbia

British Columbia has always had a fairly liberal view towards cannabis and, going into this legalization, things in BC haven’t changed a bit.

BC already has a system of established stores and the government has voted in favor of keeping the current cannabis infrastructure and will work to build and improve it in the future.

Minimum age: 19
Retail model: Private retail stores will be allowed, online sales will be controlled by the government.
Number of retail locations: No cap on the number of licenses.
Distribution and wholesale: Will be done through the BC Liquor Distribution Branch.
Home cultivation: Up to 4 plants, hidden from street view. Landlords will have the power to forbid growing cannabis in rental properties. No pot growing in daycares and assisted living homes.
Public consumption: Only where tobacco can be smoked, but not where children are present (beaches, parks, and playgrounds).

Cannabis laws in Alberta

Alberta opted into a very similar system. British Columbia and its weed laws may have rubbed off on Alberta.

The main difference is that the government in Alberta explicitly forbids smoking cannabis near areas with kids.

Age: 18
Retail model: Private retail stores will be allowed, online sales will be controlled by the government.
Number of retail locations: Initially estimated at 250 stores in the first year.
Distribution and wholesale: Directly managed by the AGLC.
Home cultivation: Up to 4 plants per household.
Public consumption: Only where tobacco can be smoked, but not where children are present (beaches, parks, and playgrounds).

Cannabis laws in Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is one of the provinces that will most likely completely ban smoking cannabis outdoors and their plan hasn’t deviated too much from the federal government’s plan at all. However, there will be a large number of dispensaries and an overall easier access to cannabis than in Ontario, its neighboring province.

The major difference between Saskatchewan and other provinces is that it will have a privately owned distribution system which will be regulated by provincial authorities.

Sask was also the last province to announce its cannabis legalization plan.

Age 19
Retail model: Private retail stores will be allowed, as well as private online sales.
Number of retail locations: 51 successful applicants as of June 1st, 2018.
Distribution and wholesale Private, but regulated by the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority.
Home cultivation Limit of four cannabis plants per household.
Public consumption The province is laying down rules that will prohibit consumption of pot in public places, like schools and daycares, citing public health concerns.

Cannabis laws in Manitoba

Manitoba is the first province on our list not to have online sales. It will also forbid growing cannabis at home to its residents — something no other province decided to do so far.

At first look it may seem like Manitoba is in line with most other provinces, but it really isn’t.

Public consumption of recreational cannabis in Manitoba will be heavily restricted as well.

Age 19
Retail model:  Private retail stores will be allowed, as well as private online sales.
Number of retail locations: So far only 28 announced stores.
Distribution and wholesale Cannabis supply will be handled by the Liquor and Lotteries Corporation.
Home cultivation: Not allowed.
Public consumption: Smoking or vaping cannabis won’t be allowed on streets, school grounds, parks, beaches or restaurant patios. It will also be banned in most indoor public areas, with some exceptions such as palliative care units in hospitals.

Cannabis laws in Ontario

If we were to rank provinces, Ontario would come in the middle of the board. Not too many freedoms, but not as many restrictions either.

Cannabis rules in Ontario are acceptable for regular smokers but don’t expect anything big. In fact, expect a huge shortage in the first few months as the province will open only 40 stores by the summer.

The provincial government has announced 150 locations within its borders, but we’ll have to wait until 2020 to see if this promise comes to life.

Age: 19
Retail model: Private retail stores will be allowed, online sales will be controlled by the government.
Number of retail stores: No cap on the number of retail stores.
Distribution and wholesale: Cannabis distribution will be controlled by Ontario Cannabis Store, a subsidiary of the Ontario LCBO.
Home cultivation: Up to 4 plants per household indoors.
Public consumption: Same rules as for smoking tobacco.

The post Cannabis laws in Canada: The complete province-by-province guide appeared first on Greencamp.

Source: https://greencamp.com/cannabis-laws-canada/

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